Whittier Scholars Photo Contest

[caption id="attachment_606" align="alignleft" width="184"]2016-05-03-19-37-29 Patrick Kellycooper ’16, Best Senior Symposia at the WSP dinner. Pic: @profrehn[/caption]

I’m excited that the Whittier Scholars Program here at Whittier College has just launched the beta version (or maybe alpha…) of our new ePortfolio system! This digital hub for Whittier Scholars will be rolled out over the next two years.... Read More | Share it now!

“Inglorious Bloggers” are glorious students

This semester I taught WSP101 a second time. This time, like last time, much of the work students did was public: they blogged on Medium.com, they posted to the class hashtag on Twitter, and we read and commented on each others’ posts as a way toward peer-to-peer learning about both digital writing and about whatever the individual person’s interests might be. Some students chose to write under their own names, some wrote under aliases. All thought carefully about their chosen digital identity for the class. Many tweeted under linked accounts to our class hashtag #wsp15.... Read More | Share it now!

Learning Just in Time (and not a moment sooner)

A Short History of (my) Networked Scholarship

The title of this blog post could also be “how to embed a Google slideshow into a WordPress blog,” since that’s what the images embedded below teach. But I also thought I’d write about searching for WordPress tricks, since so many of us are using WordPress (and other platforms) in our teaching, research, and personal digital presence. And then I realized that my real topic is the lifecycle of an idea in networked scholarship.... Read More | Share it now!

Learning Outcomes: a tense contradiction

A few years ago, as I was preparing my tenure dossier, I had occasion to reread years of student evaluations. My former approach to evaluations had been to read them immediately after a given course, to focus exclusively on any negative comments as indications of where I need to make changes for the future, and then to file them away with a shiver.... Read More | Share it now!

Making Jane Austen: 3d Printing, Digital Commonplace books, and Reading Realism

Fall semester has just ended, my desk is piled with papers to mark, and I find myself procrasti-planning future courses. I’ve been re-reading Paula Byrne’s The Real Jane Austen, a biography written through traces of material culture extant from Austen’s life and featured in her novels. As others have written, Byrne’s biography is an innovative approach to understanding Austen, and reads like a “delightful rummage through a Regency chest of drawers” (Looser). Such an approach offers a sense of intimate access to the writer’s lived experience, an achievement that makes reading the biography both satisfying and self-aware of biography’s generic voyeurism.... Read More | Share it now!