When do you say “no” to invitations?

It is a commonplace of academic life that we all need to learn to say “no” to requests and opportunities. The ability to determine our own priorities is a great privilege–one that not all of us are lucky enough to have. I am, therefore, grateful to know that I can turn down invitations. However, I rarely actual do.... Read More | Share it now!

“Inglorious Bloggers” are glorious students

This semester I taught WSP101 a second time. This time, like last time, much of the work students did was public: they blogged on Medium.com, they posted to the class hashtag on Twitter, and we read and commented on each others’ posts as a way toward peer-to-peer learning about both digital writing and about whatever the individual person’s interests might be. Some students chose to write under their own names, some wrote under aliases. All thought carefully about their chosen digital identity for the class. Many tweeted under linked accounts to our class hashtag #wsp15.... Read More | Share it now!

Digital Commons

Recently, I gave a last minute invited lecture in Dave Bourgaise’s “Tragedy of the Commons” course. The course (sounds like a great one!) is a liberal education course that examines a the concept of the shared communal commons using both scientific and cultural analysis. My lecture introduced the third unit of the of the course, the “Digital Commons.” Here are my slides.... Read More | Share it now!

Learning Just in Time (and not a moment sooner)

A Short History of (my) Networked Scholarship

The title of this blog post could also be “how to embed a Google slideshow into a WordPress blog,” since that’s what the images embedded below teach. But I also thought I’d write about searching for WordPress tricks, since so many of us are using WordPress (and other platforms) in our teaching, research, and personal digital presence. And then I realized that my real topic is the lifecycle of an idea in networked scholarship.... Read More | Share it now!

#dLRN15: Collaboration as Praxis

In mid-October, I got to attend and present at the awesome #dLRN15 held at Stanford. The conference brought together many friends in the fields of education technology, digital humanities, and academic computing. Some of these are new friends, some long standing, and some friendships existed largely online or via Twitter before the conference. It was a blast to connect with so many people who are engaged with questions similar to my own–and to do so both virtually and in person.... Read More | Share it now!